community

Celebrating NAIDOC

It’s NAIDOC Week in Australia and today the kids and I went to a local free event. Face painting, bbq, arts, sports, music and balloons. It was a great day out.

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. It started primarily as a day of protest but has also become a celebration of Aboriginal culture.The theme for this year is “Because of her, we can!” What a wonderful recognition of the active and significant role models women are at community, local, state and national levels.

NAIDOC

I’ve had open in my tabs for weeks, the facebook page for The Songkeepers, an Australian documentary (by Naina Sen) about an Aboriginal women’s choir and their journey from the Northern Territory to Germany. They are now on tour in the United States whilst the documentary is screening in Australia. I just couldn’t close that tab until I wrote about this truly inspiring  (and at times comedic!) showing.

From the website:

In the churches of remote Central Australia, a 140-year musical legacy of ancient Aboriginal languages, German sacred poetry and baroque music is being preserved by four generations of song women that make up the Central Australian Aboriginal Women’s Choir. With their charismatic musical director Morris Stuart, the choir embarks on a historical tour of Germany, taking back the baroque Lutheran hymns – brought to Australia by German missionaries… but in their own Western Arrarnta and Pitjantjatjara languages. Together these remarkable women take their music and stories of cultural survival, identity and cross-cultural collaboration to the world. 
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Please check out their Facebook page (including a clip in front of the White House!) https://www.facebook.com/thesongkeepers/?fref=mentions

And for any Australians NITV is screening the documentary this Sunday night at 8.30pm. I strongly encourage you to tune in!

 

Bibliography:

https://www.naidoc.org.au/

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Books

WWW Wednesday 10th July 2018

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Now I’m back, I’ve been waiting all week to update this meme! Our host is Sam at Taking on a World of Words. It’s fun and simple, with just three W questions to answer: What are you currently reading? What did you recently finish reading? What do you think you’ll read next? You can also join by answering and linking your blog post back on Sam’s post here.  

What did you recently finish reading:

The Household Guide to Dying by Debra Adelaide 

Whilst last week I was a bit unsure about this book, I ended up loving it. From Goodreads

Delia has made a living writing an acerbic advice column and a series of wildly successful modern household guides. As the book opens, she is barely 40 but has only a short time to live. The novel charts her preoccupation with two things: how to make provision for her husband and daughters – and how to make her peace with her past.

I think it was a bit slow starting but in reflection, considering the topic I believe it probably needed to be. The time shifts weren’t smooth but the overall pacing and characterisation were great. I have an interest in palliative care and it was from this perspective I read the book and it delivered. From blood sausages to messages left in the lawn, it was quirky and meaningful and I gave it 5/5.

My only other complaint comes from my christian perspective which didn’t quite fit with the ending but I can cope with that.*

What are you currently reading:

I have quite literally just read the first page of The Break by Katherena Vermette so I could tell the truth in this section! One of it’s opening quotes is, “the most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any” by Alice Walker, which rings truth to me and reminds me of a clip I saw on my facebook feed today of a graduation speech:

 

What do you think you’ll read next:

I’ve added a few books to my Goodreads list this last week but it’s Windfall by Penny Vincenzi I’ve requested from the library. I was on a bit of a doctor theme a few weeks back.

High-five to the reading Wolfpack 🙂

 

* I’m just not sure the world can in times to come – a post for another day (or a question to be asked)

Books · Uncategorized

WWW Wednesday 4th July 2018

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This is a meme hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words. It’s fun and simple, you just have to answer the three W’s: What are you currently reading? What did you recently finish reading? What do you think you’ll read next? You can also join by answering and linking your blog post back on Sam’s post hereI’m only a little late posting…might still be Wednesday somewhere….

What did you recently finish reading:

The World Unseen by Shamim Sarif (goodreads link)

I really enjoy listening to this audiobook. I think listening to books from different cultures works well for me because they get all the pronunciations right. The story was set in South Africa in the 1950s with the two main characters being Indian. The book touched on apartheid in a really authentic and saddening way but was primarily about women, their positions in relationships and society. The ending was perhaps a little unsatisfying but took nothing away from the wonderful growth of the characters. 4/5

(The book also came with movie dvd, not sure yet if I’ll make the time to watch it)

What are you currently reading:

The Household Guide to Dying by Debra Adelaide

I’m not quite sure to make of this book yet, the protagonist is preparing for her upcoming death and author has used a few timelines to share her story which I’m not quite on top of, still interested to see where it leads to.

What do you think you’ll read next:

The Break by Katherena Vermette is our next bookclub read but I’m also looking at When Calls the Heart by Janette Oke for a quick fix as needed.

Happy Reading Everyone 🙂

The World Unseen

 

blogging · Books · mental health

June: Six degrees of WWW

I’ve been wondering how to bring myself back into the blogging world after somewhat of a hiatus (just one post since end of March). There are a few drafts sitting around, most of which would take a lot of effort to get back to where I was when I started them.

Today though I finished a great book (not the first since March!) and it may just be my Tipping Point – this months chosen starting title for the meme, Six Degrees of Separation  hosted by booksaremyfavouriteandbest. The meme gets you to take one title, and link through six other titles to see where you end up.

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm Gladwell sounds like my kind of book. I’m a big believer in small acts of kindness and my big ambition in life is to make a difference. His focus however it seems is in how products sell so perhaps not so much my thing.

My most recent depressive experience has turned into quite a tipping point for me – I’ve quite my job, not completed one uni subject and extended another. These are pretty big changes and I wouldn’t normally advocate for making such decisions as a result of depression but after good discussions with my hubby, various friends and lots of prayer I’m feeling pretty comfortable.

Alright, now how I am going to link this to my next book….

Yeah I’m not, instead here’s the list of awesome books I’ve recently read:

  • The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein
  • The Kite Runner by Hosseini, Khaled
  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
  • The Very Grumpy Day by Stella Jones

Also for your enjoyment here’s a bit of a review from a WWW Wednesday I attempted rather awhile back

What did you recently finish reading: Tell Me Your Here by Anne Deveson this last (haha) weekend. I really like Deveson’s writing style which in this autobiography (much like her book Resilience)  shares a lot of information and personal story. It showed a harrowing image of mental health care particularly for schizophrenia and around homelessness which thankfully in her Afterword suggested improvement although I’m sure not enough.

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What do you think you’ll read next:

I have Anthony Lehman’s (an Australian comedian) book This Shirt Won’t Iron Itself which I’m looking forward to having a read of – in fact I finished it last week. There was a bit about country living and families I could relate to, especially the bar man brother but the author and I are very different people so majority of the book was really not my thing.

Thanks for having me back WP, hope you readers are all doing well, I’d love to hear about some of your recent reads or maybe a tipping point in your life.

God bless

GJ

 

Uncategorized

Cycle of my thoughts

I’ve just been introduced to the website 80,000 Hours – a career guide for ‘talented young people who want to have a social impact’. I started at the link ‘Which jobs help people the most’ which outlines fours approaches 1. Earning to give, 2. Advocacy, 3. Research and 4. Direct work.

I’ve been thinking a lot about my future lately. Study has been stressful for me this year bringing up the now-familiar negative depressive thoughts. With both children now at school and my husband having told me in the recent past that I don’t need to work my strategy has been to step back, avoid the stress and not worry too much about the outcomes.

Yesterday was technically the first due date that I didn’t hand in an assignment but I am behind on many other things I should have been doing and yet there have been some things I have managed to keep up.

Today I am seriously contemplating not completing my subjects, I need to first discuss it with my husband and then my study institution, my current to-do list.

If I take that direction, what next. I know my husband would like me to cook for him and we’d both like me to work on the house, and I am trying but honestly it’s hard.

I was thinking maybe this new website would have some answers but alas I’m tripping up on the word talented and also the concept of having a career. My current thoughts have me focusing on my roles of mother, wife and housewife, along with to keep me sane and fulfilled community work. Not really your traditional career. Although I think I could contemplate all those approaches (which they probably wouldn’t advocate – better to do one thing well maybe) as a non-paid worker. Take for example approach 1:

  • Earning to give – my husband is the partner of a successful farming business with a rather massive annual turnover. Our income numbers are high but most money goes back into the farm so in reality we see very little of it but I do believe we could give more – what can my role be…

I love the idea of advocacy and research but I don’t trust my time management skills to do it properly or my stress management skills to enforce deadlines. My current study is training me up for direct work I’m interested in but again I’m not confident of my ability to perform.

Books · Uncategorized

March: Six Degrees of Separation

Getting this one in at the last minute – feminism, bookclub and a bit of religion!

Six Degrees of Separation is hosted by booksaremyfavouriteandbest,  and gets you to take one title, and link through six other titles to see where you end up.

The book for March was The Beauty Myth by Naomi Watts. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump, adding lots to my TBR but not making much progress with my current book. I checked this title out on Goodreads, and while the plot summary had me interested the mixed reviews turned me off. In some ways I believe reading books about beauty buys into the cultural myth.

One book I added to my TBR this month was Alias Grace by Margaret Attwood, another author who writes feminist texts. Fran L wrote a great review for this book in her Top Ten Tuesday: Best Dual Timeline Novels. Having read Margaret Attwood before I was more than happy to add another of her titles to my reading list.

Her other title I’ve read is A Handmaids Tale for bookclub a few years ago. I gave it 4/5 at the time and it was a big winner in our group, even with the member who hadn’t read the postlude/notes at the end! Last month I hosted bookclub and my choice wasn’t such a hit.

I chose Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom and had to do a post about my totally awesome hosting skills (ha!) but doubt it will happen. I did cook a few Jewish dishes though which were a hit. The idea of faith and the blurb put a few readers off but they then found the book ok. We talked about how you don’t have to be a Christian to be a good person which of course is totally true. The big difference to me then is where you end up in the afterlife? (or your beliefs of is there an after life or not). Unfortunately believing in God doesn’t make Christians better people (bugger), but despite our imperfections in this life we are forgiven.

One day I would like to get my bookclub to read my all time favourite Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers, but although we agree a benefit of bookclub is reading books we wouldn’t normally read I don’t think a specifically Christian novel would go down well.

This months bookclub read was The Bells by Richard Harvel but unfortunately I couldn’t attend (school mum duties drew priority) and I didn’t get a chance to have a look at it. Have you read it, or any of these other reads? Do you choose books for a bookclub?

Hope March has been a good month of reading (or whatever your preferred leisure acitvity is) for you.

faith · social issues

National Shame

Last week Sammy Hope wrote a blog about judgement that rung bells in my head, especially in light of something I’d just read  –

“My church bulletin talked about judging this week in relation to the eighth commandment… it was a much needed learning especially in light of social media “we should remember that no one has the right to pass judgement on anyone else and rebuke him in public…theres nothing wrong with knowing it but we don’t have the right to pass judgement”

Today I wanted to share an article on my Facebook feed – (link here)

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But wouldn’t this be a prime example of passing judgment. Who am I to compare the sin’s of others? Why is it (as Sammy asked) so hard to get off our Self Righteous Horses?

And yet don’t we also need to advocate against issues like domestic violence in our society?

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Sin and forgiveness. Shame. Does Jesus forgive even Steve Smith?! Even Matt Lodge? Sin and consequences…are some sins worse than others…what should the consequences be? What is the media or society’s role? Does society know its own demons?

On this Good Friday the one thing I know is that Jesus died for me, and Praise God, Gtook my multitude of sins upon himself on the cross. 

Sammy suggested that we need to remember that only love and acceptance can win people over.  Please pray that people will recognize their sins and that as Christians we can show them the way to the cross, the only place where true forgiveness can be found.